You are here: /

How to Ace Your College Literature Review

Share this article!

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

How to succeed in your college literature review It’s no secret that college students frequently begin to find reasons to delay the completion of their academic goals and put off writing when it comes to written tasks. The majority of students fear the thought of having to spend five or six hours writing an assignment since they are so overburdened with their daily tasks and college routine. The same is true for producing a literature review, a highly specialized kind of academic work that calls for unique abilities, extensive research, and a significant amount of time spent examining pertinent scholarly sources . Initially, writing an in-depth review could seem like an incredibly challenging and mind-numbing task. But as you get experience, the writing process will become less stressful and you’ll acquire the necessary skills. Here are some easy guidelines to remember as you begin writing effective literature reviews for college courses.

WHAT IS A BOOK REVIEW? A literature review is not an academic article on its own. It usually acts as an introduction to a research paper, dissertation, or other academic assignment requiring in-depth investigation and analysis of numerous scholarly sources important to the subject of the study. This kind of academic paper gives a summary of the most important and pertinent works that have been published on the subject being studied. It provides a critical assessment of the available sources and delivers a summary of the state of the art information and viewpoint on the research topic.

FORMULATING A BOOK REVIEW Specifying Your Goals You must establish your goals before you begin writing a literature review, just like you would with any other academic paper. This entails taking a position on the subject at hand, creating an thesis statement that can be argued, and outlining your project’s goals in detail. Make sure your position is reflected throughout the entire literature study.

Performing Research After you’ve chosen your stance and established the goal of your paper, move on to compile the most pertinent sources for your research question and position. Make certain that every single source you choose for your literature evaluation is scholarly and current. It’s also a good idea to first identify the most important and vital experts in the academic field of your topic, after which you should become familiar with their most well-known works that are relevant to your topic.

Establishing the Relevance of Your Review Once you’ve finished choosing your sources for your literature review, start writing a thorough summary of each source. Be sure to explain the context of each source’s importance and contribution to the subject being discussed. Your viewpoint, the goals of the project, and your hypothesis should be the key points of your writings. Display to your audience the scientific authority and discussion-relevant content of each source.

Making It Logical and Coherent Students frequently make the error of organizing their literature reviews in the same manner as their annotated bibliographies. It’s crucial to remember that even while the literature review is a component of a larger research effort, it still counts as a full-fledged academic paper and needs to be written appropriately. Consider it a development of an argument in order to write it logically and coherently. Start by analyzing the initial concepts related to your research issue, then go over how they developed over time in the analyzed scholarly literature.

with a bibliography You are still required to provide a works cited or reference page at the conclusion of your paper even if you mention publications and their authors in your text. According to the guidelines of your chosen citation style, provide a thorough citation for each entry.

Proofreading Your completed literature review draft should be set aside for a while. Reread it the following day or in two hours, depending on how urgent your work is, and give it a fresh look. Check your writing for spelling, punctuation, grammar, and style issues. Additionally, look for coherence, style, and logical errors.

At PapersOwl , Isabelle Forster works as an editor, journalist, and independent writer. She also works as an education consultant and online tutor. Isabelle enjoys playing the piano, writing poetry, and studying new languages in her spare time. Reading, interacting with fascinating people, and supporting her pupils are some of the things that inspire her.

Related Posts:

Share this article!

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.