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Three unintentional behaviors that the HoH for the Hearing Impaired has encountered

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We have learned from the well-known culture that preconception is something obvious. That those who have predetermined ideas are very conscious of them. that when they behave unfairly toward a minority person or group, they always know what they’re doing. The truth is far more complicated. The hard of hearing regularly experience accidental acts as a result of behaviors based on preconceived notions. In light of this, let’s discuss some of the most typical accidental acts that members of the D/deaf community and the hearing impaired encounter.

A PRECONCEIVED IDEA IS WHAT? A preconceived concept is essentially an opinion developed in advance without sufficient evidence or information. Such ideas may lead to accidental, covert, or sneaky prejudice. Marginalized communities routinely deal with such acts on a daily basis. Such acts are common.

PHONE US BACK Many institutions, including government entities, were forced to scramble to create an internet presence as a result of COVID-19. Unfortunately, those who have hearing impairments were overlooked throughout that chaotic changeover. Nearly all companies, service providers, and public sector organizations have a phone number on their website to encourage customers to call them for assistance.

Check out the available channels of communication the next time you want to get in touch with a company concerning any kind of service. There’s a good probability that they like voice calls the majority of the time. a point of contact that the hearing impaired would find extremely difficult to use without hearing aids.

Most likely, they mean nothing by it. It was merely an unintended error. But for many who are unable to work, hire contractors, or keep crucial documentation, it still exhausting and frustrating.

Going too far This typically manifests as either infantilization or patronization. The former occurs when a disabled person is treated as if they are unable to take care of themselves. Exaggerating one’s speech, serving as an interpreter without being asked to, or continuously verifying that someone has heard you are all examples of ways to help the hard of hearing.

The alternative is as offensive and requires acting as though the hard of hearing person’s every action is a miracle. Condescension with good intentions. Condescension is also not liked by anyone.

DISCOMFORT SPEAKS FOR YOU IN YOU Contrary to popular belief, those who have hearing loss are not completely unaware of their surroundings. When someone is uneasy about their impairment, they may tell. Even when someone says one thing, their body language may indicate something very different.

It can be awkward to consider what you would do if you lost a fundamental sense. However, it’s crucial to keep in mind that D/deaf persons do not see their handicap as a huge impediment or an impassable cliff. They simply use language a little bit differently than other people.

THE FIRST STEP TO BETTERMENT IS AWARENESS Preconception-based behavior is frequently only a matter of perspective. And education is the best way to handle that. The D/deaf and hard of hearing communities are dynamic, distinctive, and full of exciting tales.

Ironically, hearing society only has to pay attention.
Knowledgeable author:

Pauline Dinnauer is the VP of Audiological Care at Connect Hearing , which offers the best hearing loss, testing, and consultation services for hearing aids in the US.

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