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Tips for treating your college roommate’s pet politely It’s your first time being independent, so everything is exciting and novel. You live alone with a roommate, and maybe—just maybe—you can get the dog you’ve wanted your entire life.

You need to get down and discuss with your roommates before heading out to the nearest pet rescue . Drama and communication breakdowns that make sharing a space with roommates challenging can be avoided by making sure everyone is on the same page.

We’ve put together some advice on how to properly handle having a pet while you live with others. It’s crucial to remember that this advice applies to all roommate situations even after college.

First, speak with your roommate. A healthy roommate relationship requires open communication. Prior to moving in, you should let your roommates know if you have a pet. It’s time to sit down and have a conversation with the other residents of the house or apartment if you decide you want a pet after moving in.

You must first confirm if pets are permitted in your apartment or home. The next step is to determine whether anyone there suffers from allergies, has trouble coexisting with animals due to a phobia, or simply prefers a pet-free atmosphere. As animal lovers, we can occasionally lose sight of the fact that not everyone shares our sentiments.

If everyone consents to proceed, you must also agree on the primary owner. However, if this was a joint choice, you will need to select who the pet will live with when you all eventually move out. If this was your idea, the creature is unquestionably yours.

DEVELOP SOME GROUND RULES. Establish ground rules for pet care and where the animal is allowed to go before bringing a dog or any other pet into your shared house.

Any rooms the animal is not allowed in should be discussed beforehand. A cat or dog may not bother some roommates, but they may not want one in their personal space. In order to maintain harmony in your living environment, it’s crucial to respect their bounds. Dog walking, feces scooping, and grooming responsibilities should all be split if this is a shared pet. To keep everyone accountable, you can even create a written schedule. Decide how the costs will be shared among you all. Consider opening a pooled fund account just for veterinary expenses. Decide who will be in charge of obtaining food for the animals. Making sure that your dog has food, pills, and protein toppings is made easier by using a top-notch online dog food delivery service like Hungry Bark . All of these responsibilities lie on your shoulders if this is only your pet. Even if you live with roommates who are willing to pitch in, don’t count on them to do so at all times. You will also be liable for all related expenses.

AIM HIGH AND ABOVE If the animal in question is your own pet, this is extremely crucial. Make it your duty to vacuum and dust if you own a pet, such as a dog or cat, that sheds. When they are finished playing with their toys, pick them up and keep their feeding area tidy.

This will be appreciated by your roommates, who will then view your dog or cat favorably.

A well-trained dog is a must if you own one. Both you and the dog will benefit from training. It helps your dog become much easier to handle, burns off extra energy, and maintains harmony among your roommates.

Most people don’t want to live with a jumpy dog who has a propensity to destroy things. Train your dog proactively so that they understand what is expected of them. It is not the dogs’ fault if they are an unruly, untrained dog, so they shouldn’t have to suffer.

Having pets and sharing a space with others should go easily as long as everyone is on board. Even hesitant roommates will go on board and begin to wonder what they did without their new, furry roommate if boundaries are upheld.

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